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Web Site Design



The advantages of having a web site from which to promote and sell your crafts bring enormous gains over time. Imagine your own 24 hour, 7 days a week, global brochure, catalog, store front and check out counter for $50 or less a month.

Can you purchase a classified ad these days for that amount of money? I don't think so, certainly not with the world wide coverage a web site can provide.

A web site can be finely tuned — 'optimized' is the popular term — to rank high in the search engines for keywords related to your content. This means hundreds of thousands of visitors coming to your site at virtually no cost to you.

However, a web site has only five seconds or less to grab the attention of a viewer. Web surfers are in a hurry and click away fast, unless they recognize quickly that what you provide matches their needs.

Therefore, write headlines that get viewers to linger long enough to read more about your ebook. Your site must download quickly, appear organized and easy to navigate, and above all, clearly state a unique message identifying what your site is about.

A poorly designed site is worse than useless because it creates a negative impression that lingers far longer than a favorable impact. 

Poor Richards Web Site. If you need help getting the basics of Web site design, I highly recommend, Poor Richard's Web Site. It is the book I used to build my sites and I found it easy to follow.

View a Web site as a work in progress. Fresh content attracts more visitors. Your web pages will be viewed by potentially millions of prospective buyers around the world, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Long beyond the hours you spend today, your web site can produce leveraged marketing results that would take you months, maybe years of efforts to reproduce offline, even if you could.

There are many free sites for learning HTML online. Simply do a search for "learn HTML." Or you may want to try some of the services that supply easy-to-use templates. I've put up sites within an hour or two using these tools If you're in a hurry to get your site up now, try one of the following web site builders, listed in order of cost:

* Image Cafe - This service gives several options for hosting, building your site with templates, domain name registration and more. Priced from $14.95 a month which includes domain name.

* First WebSite Builder - A series of four ebooks giving step-by-step help on designing a small business web site. Chapter topics of the first book alone describe popular myths about web sites, tools you need, how to plan your process, the mysteries of HTML uncovered, inserting graphics and links, free software, free images and much more. $29.95 for all 4 ebooks.

*Site Build It! - This site provides everything the small business owner could want. Starts you off with a free 'Affiliate Masters Course' for learning how to profit from affiliate marketing. Then SiteBuilder helps you develop the best site concept that is right for you. It brainstorms profitable topics related to your site concept. Helps you select income-earning sites affiliate programs. Finalizes and registers your domain name. Builds a Theme-Based Content Site, full of profitable topic pages. No HTML knowledge needed. Builds targeted, motivated traffic to your site. Converts your traffic into income by referring them to the income-generating sites. Annual subscription for around $440 ($37 per month.)



About the Author
James Dillehay, author of seven books, is a nationally recognized expert on marketing arts and crafts. Artist, entrepreneur, and educator, his articles have helped over 15,000,000 readers of Family Circle, The Crafts Report, Better Homes & Gardens, Sunshine Artist, Ceramics Monthly, and more. James has appeared as a featured guest on HGTV's popular The Carol Duvall Show and he is a member of the advisory board to The National Craft Association. He is editor of www.Craftmarketer.com. James is author of The Basic Guide to Selling Crafts on the Internet 

 


 

 

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